Alber­ta Whit­tle, Cyprien Gail­lard, Haris Epaminon­da, Hiwa K, James Nguyen & Vic­to­ria Pham, Sarah Mor­ris, Yael Bartana
Periph­er­al Vision

1st February – 7th May 2022
Anna Schwartz Gallery

Periph­er­al Vision takes the form of a series of sin­gu­lar pre­sen­ta­tions over the course of four­teen weeks. Impor­tant­ly, the exhi­bi­tion places empha­sis on an embod­ied rela­tion­ship to view­ing video that has been large­ly lost in recent months.

The exhi­bi­tion inau­gu­rates video works in Aus­tralia that, col­lec­tive­ly, pro­vide a con­tem­po­rary view of the world from a vari­ety of per­spec­tives. The selec­tion of works was influ­enced by the last occa­sions the cura­tors were phys­i­cal­ly able to view art togeth­er, and their sub­se­quent and ongo­ing digital/​virtual exchange and dia­logue since bor­ders closed. An exchange that was able to be main­tained through video, which has become a pri­ma­ry medi­um for us to engage new work and its ideas.

In their dis­tinct ways, each of the sev­en works in this exhi­bi­tion poet­i­cal­ly engage the urgent issues of our time. Through these works we tra­verse the earth, and are con­front­ed by what remains out of reach; much like edges of the visu­al field. Recent­ly, a lot has been writ­ten about the cen­tral ner­vous sys­tem in times of great stress. Stress reduces our field of vision, but this response can be coun­ter­act­ed by shift­ing our point of view – by dilat­ing our gaze we can see fur­ther into the periph­ery, help­ing us to dis­cov­er what’s there.


Curat­ed by Lewis Gilbert & Tania Doropou­los

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Hiwa K
Pre-Image, Por­to, 2014
from the series Mir­ror’ (2010 – ongo­ing)
HD video, colour, sound
6 min­utes, 34 sec­onds
Cour­tesy the artist & KOW
1st12th Feb­ru­ary

Pre-Image doc­u­ments a per­for­mance in Por­to, Gdan­sk and Vien­na, among oth­ers, and between Greece and Rome along the way. On his fore­head Hiwa K bal­ances a bar on which motor­bike mir­rors are mount­ed. The DIY nav­i­ga­tion instru­ment reflects the envi­ron­ment in which he is walk­ing. The bal­anc­ing act and the frag­ment­ed image in the mir­rors com­pel the artist to err on the side of cau­tion. The ver­ti­cal gaze that he uses to move for­ward hor­i­zon­tal­ly is frag­ment­ed, dis­tort­ed, unre­li­able. This allows him to re-expe­ri­ence the lack of sta­bil­i­ty in the midst of his con­stant state of move­ment dur­ing his migra­tion. The title Pre-Image refers to the dif­fer­ence between how we imag­ine the places we want to reach, their pos­si­bil­i­ties before they become images, and how they are in real­i­ty; the con­trast between ver­ti­cal­ly imag­ined places and the hor­i­zon­tal real­i­ty in which we expe­ri­ence places on the ground. The per­for­mance shows Hiwa K’s first impres­sions of the cities he dis­cov­ers on his escape route. Inter­pret­ed as a recon­struc­tion of his migra­to­ry past, of which he has no pho­tographs, the per­for­mance could also be called a post-image’.

Hiwa K was born in Kur­dis­tan-North­ern Iraq in 1975. His infor­mal stud­ies in his home town Sulay­maniyah were focused on Euro­pean lit­er­a­ture and phi­los­o­phy, learnt from avail­able books trans­lat­ed into Ara­bic. After mov­ing to Europe in 2002, Hiwa K stud­ied music as a pupil of the Fla­men­co mas­ter Paco Peña in Rot­ter­dam, and sub­se­quent­ly set­tled in Ger­many. His works escape nor­ma­tive aes­thet­ics but give a pos­si­bil­i­ty of anoth­er vibra­tion to ver­nac­u­lar forms, oral his­to­ries (Chica­go boys, 2010), modes of encounter (Cook­ing with Mama, 2006) and polit­i­cal sit­u­a­tions (This lemon tastes of apple, 2011). The repos­i­to­ry of his ref­er­ences con­sists of sto­ries told by fam­i­ly mem­bers and friends, found sit­u­a­tions as well as every­day forms that are the prod­ucts of prag­mat­ics and neces­si­ty. He con­tin­u­ous­ly cri­tiques the art edu­ca­tion sys­tem and the pro­fes­sion­al­iza­tion of art prac­tice, as well as the myth of the indi­vid­ual artist. Many of his works have a strong col­lec­tive and par­tic­i­pa­to­ry dimen­sion, and express the con­cept of obtain­ing knowl­edge from every­day expe­ri­ence rather than doctrine.

Hiwa K par­tic­i­pat­ed in var­i­ous group shows such as Man­i­fes­ta 7, Tri­ent (2008), La Tri­en­nale, Intense Prox­im­i­ty, Paris (2012), the Edg­ware Road Project” at the Ser­pen­tine Gallery, Lon­don (2012), the Venice Bien­nale (2015) and documenta14, Kassel/​Athens (2017). A selec­tion of recent solo shows include the New Muse­um, NYC (2018), S.M.A.K., Ghent (2018), Kun­stvere­in Han­nover (2018), Jameel Arts Cen­ter Dubai (2020) and Muse­um Abteiberg (2021). In 2016 he received the Arnold Bode Prize and the Scher­ing Stiftung Art Award and had a solo exhi­bi­tion at KW, Berlin (2017). His Chica­go Boys” project is con­tin­u­ous­ly host­ed by inter­na­tion­al insti­tu­tions.

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Yael Bar­tana
Tash­likh (Cast Off), 2017
HD video, colour, sound
11 min­utes
Cour­tesy the artist & Pet­zel Gallery
15th26th Feb­ru­ary

Yael Bartana’s Tash­likh serves as a plat­form for both per­pe­tra­tors and sur­vivors of var­i­ous geno­cides or eth­nic per­se­cu­tions – the Holo­caust, the Armen­ian Geno­cide, as well as Sudanese and Eritre­an eth­nic cleans­ing or civ­il wars – to con­front their per­son­al mate­r­i­al links to the hor­rors of the past. For this project, a filmic meet­ing point was cre­at­ed for peo­ple and objects, in which they sym­bol­i­cal­ly rid them­selves of objects that have sur­vived the trau­mas of geno­cide. Inspired by the Jew­ish cus­tom of Tash­likh” where cast­ing bread or oth­er objects into a riv­er sym­bol­is­es a relin­quish­ing of sins, Bartana’s work gen­er­ates a new rit­u­al that con­sists of the delib­er­ate dis­card­ing of objects as a means of psy­cho­log­i­cal liberation.

Yael Bar­tana is an observ­er of the con­tem­po­rary and a pre-enac­tor. She employs art as a scalpel inside the mech­a­nisms of pow­er struc­tures and nav­i­gates the fine and crack­led line between the soci­o­log­i­cal and the imag­i­na­tion. Over the past twen­ty years, she has dealt with some of the dark dreams of the col­lec­tive uncon­scious and reac­ti­vat­ed the col­lec­tive imag­i­na­tion, dis­sect­ed group iden­ti­ties and (an-)aesthetic means of per­sua­sion. In her films, instal­la­tions, pho­tographs, staged per­for­mances and pub­lic mon­u­ments Yael Bar­tana inves­ti­gates sub­jects like nation­al iden­ti­ty, trau­ma, and dis­place­ment, often through cer­e­monies, memo­ri­als, pub­lic rit­u­als and col­lec­tive gatherings.

Her work has been exhib­it­ed world­wide, and is rep­re­sent­ed in the col­lec­tions of many muse­ums, includ­ing the Muse­um of Mod­ern Art, New York; the Tate Mod­ern, Lon­don; and the Cen­tre Pom­pi­dou, Paris. She cur­rent­ly lives and works in Berlin and Amsterdam.

Select­ed solo exhi­bi­tions: Fon­dazione Mod­e­na Arti Visive (2019÷2020); Philadel­phia Muse­um of Art (2018); Stedelijk Muse­um, Ams­ter­dam (2015); Seces­sion, Vien­na (2012); Tel Aviv Muse­um of Art (2012); Mod­er­na Museet, Malmö (2010); MoMA PS1, New York (2008). Select­ed group exhi­bi­tions: São Paulo Bien­ni­al (2014, 2010, 2006); Berlin Bien­ni­al (2012); doc­u­men­ta 12 (2007); Istan­bul Bien­ni­al (2005), Man­i­fes­ta 4 (2002). Yael Bar­tana won the Artes Mun­di 4 Prize (2010), and the tril­o­gy And Europe Will Be Stunned was ranked as the 9th most impor­tant art work of the 21th cen­tu­ry by the Guardian news­pa­per (2019).

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James Nguyen & Vic­to­ria Pham
a Drum­stick is a Ham­mer, 2022
HD video, colour, stereo sound
70 min­utes, 54 sec­onds
Cour­tesy the artists
1st12th March

A three part video and sound col­lage on the vio­lence of infi­nite dis­tance – the murky inter­sti­tial flu­id of his­to­ry, exile, and silence. Work­ing across oceans and adjust­ing to day­light-sav­ing time, the artists explore the drum­stick as a tool of per­cus­sive dis­rup­tion. The drum­stick strikes at frag­ments, prods and pokes at bod­ies and thick mem­branes. She cre­ates a rhythm that helps us to recon­nect and speak with­out speak­ing. a Drum­stick is a Hammer.

James Nguyen is an Aus­tralian artist and film­mak­er based in Mel­bourne. He has been com­mis­sioned by insti­tu­tions such as the Aus­tralian War Memo­r­i­al, the Muse­um of Con­tem­po­rary Art for the Nation­al 2019, and oth­ers. A past recip­i­ent of the Mad­docks Art prize and the Anne & Gor­don Sam­stag Inter­na­tion­al Visu­al Arts Schol­ar­ship, James has had the oppor­tu­ni­ty to devel­op projects and work col­lab­o­ra­tive­ly on exper­i­men­tal doc­u­men­tary, research and cura­to­r­i­al exchanges in NYC, Europe and the Asia Pacific.

Vic­to­ria Pham is an instal­la­tion artist, com­pos­er and evo­lu­tion­ary biol­o­gist. She cur­rent­ly is a PhD Can­di­date in Bio­log­i­cal Anthro­pol­o­gy at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Cam­bridge. Her spe­cial­i­sa­tion is in archaeo-acoustic tech­nol­o­gy and the evo­lu­tion of music. Her work is dri­ven by explo­rations into the con­nec­tions between sec­ond-hand mem­o­ry, exam­in­ing modes of decoloni­sa­tion, com­mu­nal sto­ry­telling and eco­log­i­cal expres­sions of con­struc­tion.

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Haris Epaminon­da
Chimera, 2019
stills, digi­tised super 8 film, colour, sound
34 min­utes, 15 sec­onds
Sound by Kel­ly Jayne Jones
Cour­tesy the artist & Rodeo
15th26th March

Chimera in Greek mythol­o­gy is a female fire-breath­ing hybrid mon­ster, with the head of a lion, the body of a goat and a ser­pent for a tail. Med­i­tat­ing on time, place, and mem­o­ry the film is an exper­i­men­tal audio-visu­al trav­el­ogue. Fol­low­ing the rays of the sun and trac­ing its shad­ows, it acts as an opti­cal mirage. The film takes as its start­ing point super 8 film footage shot in and around the Cal­i­forn­ian desert in 2014; most of which was dam­aged dur­ing devel­op­ment. Using this res­cued footage, togeth­er with shots tak­en on dif­fer­ent trav­els, the film oscil­lates between real­i­ty and fan­ta­sy, nature and cul­ture, light and dark­ness. Kel­ly Jayne Jones, a sound and per­for­mance artist com­posed and cre­at­ed the ambi­ent elec­tron­ic score of the film. 

Haris Epaminon­da often uses exist­ing mate­ri­als such as pho­tographs sourced from books and found objects, sculp­ture, text and col­lage, assem­bled and com­bined with struc­tures and sup­ports she has designed her­self. Her instal­la­tions con­jure up visu­al puz­zles that sug­gest a mul­ti­tude of meanings.

Her lan­guage often tends to abstrac­tion, evok­ing mys­te­ri­ous atmos­pheres that defy pre­cise clas­si­fi­ca­tion. Many of her shows sur­prise the view­er with the frag­men­tary way that scat­tered, rhyth­mic units are reassem­bled into some­thing only at the end of the exhi­bi­tion. Every­thing is on the bor­ders, at the edges, hid­den in the cor­ners, sus­pend­ed … until, as one pro­ceeds, the space rede­fines and reshapes itself, like the syl­la­bles of a phrase being grad­u­al­ly revealed.

Haris Epaminon­da has pre­sent­ed solo exhi­bi­tions at Seces­sion, Vien­na (2018); Aspen Art Muse­um, Aspen (2017); TENT, Rot­ter­dam (2015); Fon­dazione Queri­ni Stam­palia, Venice (2014); Point Cen­tre for Con­tem­po­rary Art, Nicosia (2013); Mod­ern Art Oxford, UK (2013); Kun­sthaus Zürich (2013); Muse­um of Mod­ern Art, New York (2011); Schirn Kun­sthalle, Frank­furt (2011); Tate Mod­ern, Lon­don (2010); and Malmö Kon­sthall, Malmö (2009). Her work was includ­ed in dOC­U­MEN­TA, Kas­sel (2012), and in 2007, Epaminon­da co-rep­re­sent­ed Cyprus at the 52nd Venice Biennale.

Her works are rep­re­sent­ed in the per­ma­nent col­lec­tions of Deste Foun­da­tion of Con­tem­po­rary Art, Athens; Frac-ile-de-France, Paris; Kun­sthaus Zürich; Lenbach­haus, Munich; Louis Vuit­ton Foun­da­tion, Paris; Nation­al Cen­tre for Visu­al Arts (CNAP), Paris; TATE Mod­ern, Lon­don.

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Sarah Mor­ris
Bei­jing, 2008
35mm/​Magic Pix­el Box, 84 min­utes, 47 sec­onds
Cour­tesy the artist & White Cube
29th March – 9th April

Bei­jing observes the over­whelm­ing­ly per­plex­ing and con­tra­dic­to­ry econ­o­my and pol­i­tics of Chi­na. The film explores the spec­ta­cle that unfold­ed dur­ing the open­ing of the 2008 Olympics. Shot from mul­ti­ple per­spec­tives and giv­en unprece­dent­ed access by the Inter­na­tion­al Olympic Com­mit­tee, Bei­jing cap­tures the vari­ances with­in the city, from the urban rou­tine of its cit­i­zens to the chore­o­graphed actions of var­i­ous heads of state. Mor­ris employs the notion of dual­i­ty, cou­pling it with the con­stant pres­ence of the spec­ta­cle or the event and its con­stant mul­ti­ple inter­pre­ta­tions. Mor­ris’s ver­sion of cin­e­ma vérité uses not only archi­tec­ture and its infra­struc­ture as phan­tom char­ac­ters, but also expos­es polit­i­cal lead­ers, Olympic ath­letes, actors, film direc­tors, and archi­tects in a qua­si-nar­ra­tive about this devel­op­ing city that opens up numer­ous fic­tion­al pos­si­bil­i­ties and ques­tions the author­ship of the spec­ta­cle itself and ulti­mate­ly, the role of the artist.

Since the mid-1990s, Sarah Mor­ris has been mak­ing abstract paint­ings and films to inves­ti­gate what she describes as urban, social and bureau­crat­ic typolo­gies”. These works, based on dif­fer­ent cities, are derived from close inspec­tion of archi­tec­tur­al details com­bined with a crit­i­cal sen­si­tiv­i­ty to the psy­chol­o­gy of a city and its key protagonists.

Mor­ris began her career mak­ing graph­ic paint­ings that adapt­ed the dra­mat­ic, emo­tive lan­guage used in news­pa­per and adver­tis­ing tag lines. Her city-based paint­ings are exe­cut­ed in house­hold gloss paint on square can­vas­es, employ­ing rig­or­ous, all-over grids that ref­er­ence archi­tec­tur­al motifs, signs or urban vis­tas. Their vivid colours derive from each city’s unique vocab­u­lary and palette, but, most impor­tant­ly, its dynam­ic. In her film work, Mor­ris both seduces and alien­ates the view­er, employ­ing dif­fer­ent kinds of cin­e­matog­ra­phy, from doc­u­men­tary record­ing to seem­ing­ly set-up nar­ra­tive sce­nar­ios. In her film Los Ange­les (2005), for instance, Mor­ris explores an indus­try fuelled by fan­ta­sy and exam­ines the tren­chant rela­tion­ship between stu­dio, pro­duc­er, direc­tor and tal­ent. In Cap­i­tal, part of Mor­ris’ series about Wash­ing­ton DC, Mor­ris gained unprece­dent­ed access to the inside work­ings of Clin­ton’s last days in office.

Fol­low­ing Los Ange­les, Mor­ris embarked on more inti­mate por­trait films, such as Robert Towne (2005) and 1972 (2008), which shift the view­point from the panora­ma of a city to an indi­vid­ual por­trait of one of its pro­tag­o­nists, as a way of exam­in­ing it from the inside out. Fol­low­ing these works, Mor­ris made Bei­jing (2008), a film about one of the most intri­cate and ambigu­ous inter­na­tion­al broad­cast­ed events of past years — the 2008 Olympic Games.

Sarah Mor­ris has exhib­it­ed exten­sive­ly includ­ing solo exhi­bi­tions at Ullens Cen­ter for Con­tem­po­rary Art, Bei­jing (2018); Espoo Muse­um of Mod­ern Art, Fin­land (2017); M Muse­um, Leu­ven, Bel­gium (2015); Kun­sthalle Bre­men, Ger­many (2013); Wexn­er Cen­ter for the Arts, Colum­bus, Ohio (2012); Fon­da­tion Beyel­er, Basel, Switzer­land (2008); Muse­um Boi­j­mans van Beunin­gen, Rot­ter­dam (2006); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2005); Ham­burg­er Bahn­hof, Berlin (2001); and Mod­ern Art Oxford, UK (1999). Group exhi­bi­tions include Solomon R. Guggen­heim Muse­um, New York (2017); Tate Tri­en­ni­al, Tate Britain, Lon­don (2003); 25th Bien­al de São Paulo (2002); and 4th Site San­ta Fe Bien­ni­al, New Mex­i­co (2001).

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Alber­ta Whit­tle
HOLD­ING THE LINE (JUNE 2020), 2020
2K and HD video, mobile phone footage
13 min­utes
Cour­tesy the artist & Cop­per­field
12th23rd April

Tak­ing the voice of the Riv­er Thames as its start­ing point, Whit­tle worked with sci­ence fic­tion writer Ama Josephine Budge, for Hold­ing the Line. Whittle’s video looks at colo­nial his­to­ries, police bru­tal­i­ty and imag­ined futures offer­ing time and space for heal­ing and reset.

Alber­ta Whit­tle is an artist, researcher and cura­tor. She was cho­sen for the Mar­garet Tait Award for 20189, the Turn­er Prize 2020 bur­sary, the Hen­ry Moore Foun­da­tion artist award 2020 and the Frieze Artist Award 2020. Her cre­ative prac­tice is moti­vat­ed by the desire to man­i­fest self-com­pas­sion and col­lec­tive care as key meth­ods in bat­tling anti-black­ness. Oscil­lat­ing between cut­ting humour and sen­si­tive poet­ics her work ranges across media and across continents.

Cur­rent and upcom­ing projects include Frag­ments of Epic Mem­o­ry, AGO, Toron­to; We are His­to­ry, Som­er­set House, Lon­don; Sex Ecolo­gies, Kun­stal Trond­heim; Life Between Islands, Caribbean-British Artists 1950s — now, Tate Britain, Lon­don; British Art Show 9; Life Sup­port: Forms of Care in Art and Activism, Hay­ward Gallery Touring.

Alber­ta Whit­tle will rep­re­sent Scot­land at the 59th Inter­na­tion­al Art Exhi­bi­tion of the Venice Bien­nale in 2022.

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Cyprien Gail­lard
Ocean II Ocean, 2019
HD col­or video with sound
10 min­utes 56 sec­onds
Cour­tesy the artist & Sprüth Magers
26th April – 7th May

As with much of Cyprien Gail­lard’s work, his film Ocean II Ocean (2019) con­nects dis­parate, evoca­tive ref­er­ences into a con­cer­to of images, sound, and move­ment. The film is divid­ed into two main sec­tions that fol­low upon each oth­er in an infi­nite loop. In the first, Gaillard’s cam­era focus­es on fos­sils encrust­ed in the under­ground walls of metro sta­tions in Rus­sia and the for­mer Sovi­et Bloc, such as Moscow, Saint Peters­burg, Kiev, Tblisi, and Berlin. Con­struct­ed by the Com­mu­nist Régime as a pro­pa­gan­da tool to cel­e­brate Sovi­et pow­er and inge­nu­ity, the sta­tions are clad in mar­ble quar­ried from var­i­ous Sovi­et moun­tain ranges. As in Gaillard’s new sculp­tures, the fos­sils speak to the pre­his­toric, watery his­to­ries of the sites that gen­er­at­ed these mate­ri­als; brought togeth­er from so many dif­fer­ent places and peri­ods, they coex­ist in these final, polit­i­cal­ly loaded locations.

The oth­er half of Ocean II Ocean fol­lows MTA sub­way cars on a jour­ney across tracks, through bridges, onto barges, and then out to sea, cer­e­mo­ni­ous­ly dumped into the Atlantic Ocean in an effort to ben­e­fit aquat­ic life — glimpses of an arti­fi­cial reef­ing pro­gram whose goals in many ways mir­ror those of Rigs to Reefs. Div­ing below the water’s sur­face, the cam­era cap­tures marine ani­mals mov­ing among the steel car­riages. More­over, the fre­net­ic ener­gy of the film’s sound­track, pro­duced by Gail­lard from sam­ples of record­ings of a steel pan orches­tra, con­nects these stain­less steel car­cass­es with the per­cus­sive sound of steel, as if its vibra­tions might be ema­nat­ing from the train cars them­selves. Known for their car­ni­va­lesque echoes, steel pans are his­tor­i­cal­ly from Trinidad and Toba­go and tra­di­tion­al­ly made from dis­card­ed oil bar­rels, whose orig­i­nal con­tents relate both to the cre­ation of fos­sil fuel and to the con­tem­po­rary pol­lu­tion and demise of under­wa­ter life. Con­nect­ing Ocean II Oceans two seg­ments is a lush, albeit decep­tive, vor­tex that is revealed to be a stain­less steel New York pub­lic toi­let, mid-flush. Its flow­ing move­ments link the work’s seg­ments and avert any break­age in sound or image, empha­siz­ing the cycli­cal nature not only of Gaillard’s film, but also of the shift­ing cycles of drain­ing and ris­ing that the world’s oceans have expe­ri­enced and con­tin­ue to undergo.

Ocean II Ocean pre­miered at the 58th Inter­na­tion­al Art Exhi­bi­tion of the Venice Bien­nale in 2019.

Cyprien Gail­lard (b. 1980, Paris) lives and works in Berlin. He is the recip­i­ent of numer­ous prices such as Arken Art Prize and Award for Best Exper­i­men­tal Short Film, Mel­bourne Inter­na­tion­al Film Fes­ti­val (both 2016), Preis der Nation­al­ga­lerie (2011) and Prix Mar­cel Duchamp (2010). Gail­lard holds a degree from L’É­cole Can­tonale d’Art de Lau­sanne. Select­ed solo exhi­bi­tions include: Mori Art Muse­um, Tokyo (2021), TANK Shang­hai (2019), Accel­er­a­tor Kon­sthall, Stock­holm (2019), Muse­um Tingue­ly, Basel (2019), K20 Kun­st­samm­lung Nor­drhein-West­falen, Dus­sel­dorf (2016), Julia Stoschek Col­lec­tion, Dus­sel­dorf (2015), MoMA PS1, New York (2013), Ham­mer Muse­um, Los Ange­les (2013), Fon­dazione Nico­la Trussar­di, Milan (2012), Schinkel Pavil­lon, Berlin (2012), Cen­tre Georges Pom­pi­dou, Paris (2011), KW Insti­tute for Con­tem­po­rary Art, Berlin (2011), and Kun­sthalle Basel (2010). Sig­nif­i­cant group exhi­bi­tions include: Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2021), Julia Stoschek Col­lec­tion, Berlin (2021), GAMeC, Berg­amo (2021), Ham­burg­er Bahn­hof, Berlin (2020), 58th Venice Bien­nale (2019), Fon­da­tion Vin­cent van Gogh, Arles (2019), Cleve­land Tri­en­ni­al (2018), Gropius Bau, Berlin (2018), Fon­da­tion Louis Vuit­ton, Paris (2018), ARoS Tri­en­ni­al, Aarhus (2017), The Red Brick Art Muse­um, Bei­jing (2017), Hir­sh­horn Muse­um and Sculp­ture Gar­den, Wash­ing­ton, D.C. (2017), Hay­ward Gallery, Lon­don (2016), 13th Bien­nale de Lyon (2015), 54th Venice Bien­nale (2011), Gwangju Bien­nale (2010) and 5th Berlin Bien­nale (2008).


Images

Hiwa K

Pre-Image, Por­to, 2014
from the series Mir­ror’ (2010 – ongoing)
HD video, colour, sound
6 min­utes, 34 seconds
Cour­tesy the artist & KOW

Yael Bar­tana

Tash­likh (Cast Off), 2017
HD video, colour, sound
11 minutes
Cour­tesy the artist & Pet­zel Gallery

James Nguyen & Vic­to­ria Pham

Frag­ments and Shadows, 2021
Two Frag­ments of 3000 year old Viet­namese Bronze Dong Son Drum with shad­ow of hands and fin­gers over drum surface
From:
a Drum­stick is a Ham­mer, 2022
HD video, colour, stereo sound
70 min­utes, 54 seconds
Image tak­en by Vic­to­ria Pham 2021
Cour­tesy the artists

Haris Epaminon­da

Chimera, 2019
stills, digi­tised super 8 film, colour
34 min­utes, 15 seconds
Sound by Kel­ly Jayne Jones
Cour­tesy the artist & RODEO

Sarah Mor­ris

Bei­jing, 2008
35mm/​HD
84 min­utes 47 seconds
Cred­it the artist & White Cube

Alber­ta Whittle

HOLD­ING THE LINE (JUNE 2020), 2020
2K and HD video, mobile phone footage
13 minutes
Cour­tesy the artist & Copperfield

Cyprien Gail­lard

Ocean II Ocean, 2019
HD col­or video with sound
10 min­utes, 56 seconds
© Cyprien Gaillard
Cour­tesy the artist & Sprüth Magers