Emily Floyd
Temple of the Female Eunuch

Temple of the Female Eunuch
, 2008
Installation view
Click to enlarge

Continuing Emily Floyd’s engagement with the modern literary cannon, The Temple of The Female Eunuch consists of large sculptural figures, surrounded by a field of wooden blocks inscribed with questions and statements taken from The Female Eunuch by Germaine Greer.

From a personal perspective, the work has allowed Floyd to explore questions of identity – her time and place – and more broadly it aims to provoke and contribute to ongoing debate on feminism, and feminism and art making. The work is a monument to the forces required to make revolution. The imposing wooden figures were developed from the headless torso on the front cover of the first edition of The Female Eunuch and the 100 wooden blocks reference the wooden blocks that Floyd remembers from her childhood and which, in the ‘70s, were used to develop children’s spatial cognition and problem solving abilities. The aesthetic and the materials – vinyl and poker work – are deliberately “folk”, 70s and evocative of Rael architecture and “earth mothers”. The bubble-styled text reorders Greer’s statements and words to raise questions and encourage debate.

Acknowledging the flurry of museum exhibitions in 2007 of “feminist art” Floyd’s installation posits questions of whether feminism should be only a social movement; feminist art has a style; feminism is locked in the 70s; what sort of artwork can a feminist make and does feminism have a future.

Emily Floyd

Temple of The Female Eunuch
, 2007
Pokerwork and plastic on wood
Dimensions variable