Marco Fusinato
Double Infinitives

Double Infinitives
, 2009
Installation view
Click to enlarge
DOUBLE INFINITIVES

“Unheard music is better than heard” (Greek proverb of late antiquity).

“That music be heard is not essential – what it sounds like may not be what it is” (Charles Ives, Essays Before a Sonata).

The proposition of Jacques Attali’s Noise is different. He says that while noise is a deadly weapon, silence is death.

-David Rattray, How I Became One of the Invisible. Semiotext(e), 1992.

The explosive communal act of rioting is most commonly delivered to an audience suspended in the stillness and silence of a photographic image. Noise is not removed in this process, it is almost amplified: the sound and action that deliver this singularly captured moment into existence are infinite, as all things remain while they are imagined, before they are anchored down by express articulation.

Photographic representation can easily be accused of subverting the truth of events, not because what is seen in the image has not transpired, but because static images leave so much space around them for multiple narratives to be constructed. The still image is totally contingent on the consciousness that confronts it. By contrast, the near-totality of videos can give too much away…

Sourced by Fusinato from print media published in the last few years, these images of rioting all contain an individual clutching a rock, bathed in the refractory glow of a nearby fire. The image has become prototypical, so much so that it lacks the sensation of spontaneity requisite to produce a riot. (Apropos to this predictability, Fusinato would check global newspapers after every forum or conference of global financial authorities, often finding the image he was looking for).

Double Infinitives is a succinct allegory for the reluctance to compromise comfort overpowering radical impulses. Conversations suggest this is a conflict frequently experienced by artists. Deprived of a volatile political reality, we experience radicalism through images that act as small ruptures, reminders that the world we live in might be more severely charged than our individual experiences allow. Fusinato’s works flatten these images of volatility onto a smooth slate: they are similar and radiate with the vexed beauty of sameness. A riot is a mad and brutal spectacle, a theatre that is often documented as if it were a play. Hugely expanded in scale and rendered in the suffused gloss of advertising, the real possibility of violence that these works infer deepens the layers of the fiction rather than comprising an indicator of human concern. Those things with which we come into such gentle contact that their thorns barely prick…

Liv Barrett
June 2009

BIOGRAPHY

Marco Fusinato
born 1964. Lives and works in Melbourne.

Marco Fusinato is a multidisciplinary artist whose work is a series of propositions that question and re-configure accepted cultural forms and concepts, laying bare their construction, re-using them in particular contexts, exploring how those worlds are made.

His first solo exhibition was in 1993 at the artist-run space Store 5 in Melbourne. Significant solo and collaborative exhibitions since include Double Infinitives, Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne, 2009; Mass Black Implosion, Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney 2008; The Approaching of the Disco Void – Repeated and Other Works, Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne, 2006; Marco Fusinato Mutlu Cerkez, Art Gallery of NSW, Contemporary Project Space, Sydney, 2005; Photographs (Sun Series), Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, 2005; AND (Mutlu Çerkez AND Marco Fusinato), Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, Melbourne, 2003; TM/MF, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne (with Thurston Moore), 2000.

Marco Fusinato’s work has been exhibited extensively in significant group exhibitions both nationally and internationally including; Sonic Youth etc. – Sensational Fix, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Germany and The Museum of Malmo, Sweden, 2009; NEW 09, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 2009; Lo Sguardo di Giano, American Academy in Rome, Rome, Italy, 2009; To make a work of timeless art: MCA Primavera Acquisitions, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2008; Underplayed: A Mix-Tape of Music-based Videos, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, USA 2006; The Unquiet World, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 2006; Sensational: Sight and Sound Installations, Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand 2005; Pitch Your Own Tent, Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne, Australia 2005; ART>MUSIC: Rock, Pop, Techno, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2001; and Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia,1998.

Alongside exhibiting in gallery contexts Fusinato has had a long history of working with (and making) experimental music. He has released many editions of conceptual music related artefacts. His sound works explore the language of noise. His primary focus is on the unconventional use and abuse of the electric guitar and related electronic devices. ‘He extends the traditional language of the guitar to distressed oblivion, compounding deracinated electronic detritus into over-amplified dreamweapons, unleashing tsunamis of ecstatic free noise’. His new solo record Ripping Skies on US noise label No Fun Productions will be released in July 2009. Apart from his solo performances Fusinato also plays in the duo POLETOPRA (with composer Anthony Pateras).

Presented as part of the 2008 Melbourne International Arts Festival, Fusinato co-curated the major international exhibition 21:100:100 which featured 100 sound works by 100 artists from the 21st Century. He is also currently curating an ongoing series titled YOU DON’T HAVE TO CALL IT MUSIC: music by visual artists in Melbourne.

Marco Fusinato

Double Infinitive I
, 2009
UV halftone ink on aluminium
250 x 250 cm

Marco Fusinato

Double Infinitive 2
, 2009
UV halftone ink on aluminium
250 x 625 cm

Marco Fusinato

Double Infinitive 3
, 2009
UV halftone ink on aluminium
250 x 250 cm

Marco Fusinato

Double Infinitive 4
, 2009
UV halftone ink on aluminium
250 x 500 cm

Marco Fusinato

Double Infinitive 5
, 2009
UV halftone ink on aluminium
250 x 500 cm